NFT Atlanta Morningside / Lenox Hills

Morningside / Lenox Hills

Being a Morningside mom isn’t just a title; it’s a lifestyle. It’s a gorgeous neighborhood, if you can dodge the botox-injected breeders in their Lexus SUVs as they drive precious little Madison and Tyler to school. At the other end of the moral spectrum (depending on your point of view), the industrial Cheshire Bridge Road area is home to seedy strip clubs and adult video stores.




         


This Neighborhood Featured in...
'Que Crazy

By Josh Green
Join Josh Green on a meticulously itemized journey 'cross the dusty Georgian badlands in pious search of the best barbecue, the finest fixings, the friendliest waitstaff and the deadliest catch. Underrated, Overly-Smoked, Texas-Style and Hard-to-Find. Josh Green has seen it all. And now he's ready to dole out his blessings and curse the rest of the BBQ joints to hell.

Read More...
Driving in Atlanta: The Art of Traffic Zen

By Ben Bowlin
The streets of Atlanta: A perilous labyrinth of unknowable danger. Will you make it out alive? Only Ben Bowlin can tell.

Read More...

On Our Radar:

Posted By:  Beth Linder
Photo:  Beth Linder

The Varsity
Everyone and their grandmother's uncle, twice removed, has heard of Atlanta's iconic Varsity restaurant. Yet despite its renowned presence in the South, few realize that its younger sister, The Varsity Jr., has been offering the nostalgia of a 1950's diner, complete with curbside service for 35 years, with far fewer crowds and ample parking. And it's the same famed Varsity grub you know and love--from naked dogs to an All the Way with strings--so step on up as a cashier, who seems to have adopted speed as their daily vitamin, screams for your order and continues to move the line at bullet-shooting pace. Though you'll feel like cattle being herded to the slaughterhouse, take no offense. This unorthodox, in-your-face methodology is the heart and soul of a commodity Atlantans and the so-called "non-tourists" have embraced as quintessential Georgia culture. Eat in, take out, or drive thru, tell 'em what you'll have and don't forget the Frosted Orange.



Posted By:  Carrie Neal Walden
Photo:  Carrie Neal Walden

Taverna Plaka
That's right: This Radar title is the literal translation of plaka. And if you stay late at the Taverna, you'll get a sense of the real meaning (wink, wink)... At this lively, fiery spot on Cheshire Bridge, you'll find authentic Greek cuisine served "taverna-style"--whatever's ready first is served first, until everyone's more than satisfied. From soups and small plates like hummus, calamari, or orzo salad, to tzatziki and flaming cheese, souvlaki and all variety of finely grilled meat served as kabobs, you'll be well-fed. After you've had your fill and the night has set in, the real fun begins. The ouzo flows, the music thrums and the belly-dancers wind their way through the crowds starting at 10pm--definitely a treat you don't want to miss, and one you might find yourself enjoying often!



Posted By:  Carrie Neal Walden
Photo:  Carrie Neal Walden

International Bakery
Sometimes, you need something sweet. Other times, you need something salty. Then there are those times when you need that special kind of Greek artichoke or particular kind of Indian spice for a special dish you're making. One place you can find all of these things is International Bakery. Tucked neatly into a small strip mall on Cheshire Bridge, this haven of goodies from around the globe has catered to all manner of tastes and cuisines for years. From divine baklava to pretty petit fours, authentic Greek pasta to jars and jars of all manner of veggies and spreads from nations across the world, you can find things to suit every palate. Order early if you want something special for a holiday, but stop by often to pick up everyday treats and hard-to-find ingredients!



Posted By:  Carrie Neal Walden
Photo:  Carrie Neal Walden

The Inn at Barking Hound Village
I have one pretty pampered dog. And we both know it. Where does he get his swanky on? Where does he go for "a long weekend"? Nowhere but Barking Hound! Barking Hound has multiple locations in the city, but the best ones (we think) for small dogs and their, um, particular owners are the two locations off Cheshire Bridge: Barking Hound Village and The Inn at Barking Hound Village. The Inn is better for those with really small puppies (Big's only four pounds, so his getaways are usually here) but they do grooming at both locations, and have great training classes at the Village as well as a nice selection of everything from collars to accessories and more! Best of all? The staff really does love dogs, and they actually remember and make note of any special owner-or-dog requests to make sure they take care of your best friend just like you would!



Posted By:  Beth Linder
Photo:  Beth Linder

Happy Herman's
Who'd have thought you'd find such a charming little gem at the crossroads of Cheshire Bridge and Hanky Panky? Yes, nestled in the heart of Atlanta's Red Light District, tucked quietly between strip clubs and franchise sex shops is a rare find known as Happy Herman's. An Atlanta landmark since 1948, this quaint market and eatery shares its vast array of wines and International gourmet delights with only those who have discovered its whereabouts. This is where gift basket heaven meets the ultimate tuna melt on pumpernickel. Hot specials are served daily for the sit-down customer, while the eat-on-the run rascal can snag a tasty bag of trail mix, or even those yummy melt-in-your-mouth mint candies. Either way, it's a buy-your-food-and-eat-it-too haven for the happy customer--Herman, or otherwise.



Posted By:  Katherine Dean
Photo:  Katherine Dean

Quiktrip
When a pal with reliable taste buds told me that I simply had to try the taquitos at QuikTrip, directing me toward the hot dog warmers at the center of the store, I skeptically raised an eyebrow and seriously reconsidered our friendship. Sure, QT's reputation is top-notch. They've got friendly and ultra-efficient attendants, superbly clean bathrooms, free air, the cheapest gas in the city, a wall of fountain beverages just this side of intimidating (we're talking both crushed and cubed ice here, folks) and, by far, the best convenience store coffee in the state. But consuming food that had spent even one second on a gas station rotisserie just seemed kind of icky. Luckily, I was starving and broke, so I gave them a go. To my surprise, the taquitos were: a.) Hot, and b.) Good, damn good, in fact. Before I knew it, I had wolfed down two of the delicious spicy-meat-bean-and-processed-cheese-stuffed, corn-tortilla-wrapped tubes. I quickly declared them junk food perfection—satisfying, addictive and bad for the waistline. For those of you raising an eyebrow and mentally reaffirming your steadfast belief that all filling station fare is bad, I say: Eat a taquito at QuikTrip. Just do it. They're available for 99 cents apiece 24/7.



Posted By:  Katherine Dean
Photo:  J.E. Kemp

Bamboo Luau's Chinatown
Moo Goo Gai Pan at 2:30 in the morning? Hell yeah! Last Friday night, after another championship drinking session, I had the pleasure of experiencing Bamboo Luau (again). It always happens the same way: my friends and I start the evening way too early, it goes way too late and then our burbling stomachs make the decision for us: It’s time to eat. Krystal? No. Waffle House? No. We run through the short list. Despite Atlanta’s thriving Scene, there is a serious dearth of late-night dining options in the city. We enthusiastically settle on Bamboo Luau and I can already taste the sweet & creamy Crab Rangoon and lip-smacking Szechwan Beef. Once we get there, we peruse the drink menu—Suffering Bastard, Mai Tai, Zombie, Scorpion, etc. We’re not up for it this time but the option is certainly there for us, should we want to keep the party going. Next, we choose from all manner of Americanized Asian staples—Fried Rice, General Tso’s Chicken, Beef with Broccoli; you know your favorites. We drunkenly debate ordering the Peeking Duck, which is a whole crispy duck that actually gets served at all hours (trust me, I have a friend who does it all the time). When the food arrives, we stuff our faces full of stir-fried, sautéed, glazed deliciousness, all atop a fluffy pile of ever-present, alcohol-absorbing white rice. By 2:55 am, we’ve settled up and are on our way to sleep it off.



Posted By:  Mark Rogers
Photo:  Mark Rogers

Thaicoon & Sushi Bar
When my taste buds came of age in the late 90s, I saw how Thai restaurants, all the rage back then, used an exotic set of flavors to entice American clientele. Cilantro, coconut, lime, red pepper, and galangal once seemed quite a radical mix. With people still waxing nostalgic over the romance of the Thailand set forth in such films as The King and I, restaurateurs opened kitschy places like “Siam Palace” where ironic Emory post-grads amused themselves with the off-putting and too-spicy “Thai One On.” Anyway, forget all of that, Thaicoon hits the spot. It’s not overly nostalgic or cutesy, the cuisine is expertly prepared, and the prices are appealing. This is no gloppy, collegiate Asian fast food affair, here the vegetables are crisp and lightly sauced. The menu, by the way, is exhaustive! It covers everything from vegetarian and meat options from provincial China, Japan and Thailand as well as a sushi bar. You get polite “American-style” Asian fusion—no organ meats or dried octopus genitals here. Three words for the poor and hungry: beef and broccoli. And be sure to check out the sushi chef’s knife skills, he loves to show off.



Posted By:  Jamie Grimes
Photo:  Jamie Grimes

Waikiki Hawaiian BBQ
Don’t believe me? Believe me, but don’t think it could possibly be anything less than a culinary abomination waiting to destroy the very fabric of your taste buds? Why not find out for yourself how Waikiki Hawaiian Barbecue can continue to draw in clientele and garner rave reviews with its eccentric take on the Japanese standard? Granted, if you’re looking for innovation in other arenas of the restaurant from presentation to inventiveness, you’ll be disappointed. But pay no mind to the fast-food-like cashier table with illuminated menus and numbered entrees or the close-quarters, hope-you-like-making-new-friends style of dining; the real treat here is the sushi, which finally treats Spam with the care it deserves, breaking the serving into small, tolerable samplings in sushi roll fashion. Food is inexpensive, and the only threat to your wallet is the good possibility that, once you’ve tasted it for yourself, you’ll go back for a second helping just because you can’t believe you liked it. And if you have a friend that doesn’t like Spam, then wait until the meal is done to break the news to Mr. Python. He’ll never see it coming…



Posted By:  Jamie Grimes
Photo:  Jamie Grimes

Artuzzi's
If you come into Artuzzi’s lacking knowledge of pastas and sauces, then you’re in for a special experience. You’re met immediately with a large board of options a la the above mentioned burrito houses. There are salads and sandwiches, soups and pizzas, but the most attractive option allows for personal creations, which, if you’re not a culinary mastermind, isn’t necessarily a good thing. The best I could do was stutter, stammer, rethink, and eventually concede my pathetic attempt at trying to figure which sauces would go best with which of the many available pasta choices in favor of one of the listed concoctions, and, while it ended up being a good pizza, I was left wondering if I shouldn’t read a cookbook before my next visit. I can see the purpose of this place. I think the concept is wonderful, but unless you know your stuff, the options before you can be threatening. Catch the right crew on the right night and you’ll get fairly helpful recommendations. Go at other times and you’re on your own, kiddies. Good thing about Artuzzi’s, though, is that, no matter what you decide, it’s made fresh your way just as you order it.



Posted By:  Mark Rogers
Photo: 

Atlanta has the best baklava this side of Lesbos. And it can be found at the International Bakery on Cheshire Bridge Road. Cheshire Bridge is as schizoid as Bush’s America, with good old-fashioned Mafia-owned Italian restaurants, pawn and porno outlets, head shops, and B-level strip clubs. So where else would the best baklava in town be? Oh, and the owner is Atlanta’s own “Soup Nazi.” So, if you can stand an Old World paternalistic glare, you will be rewarded with flakey croissants, perfectly sweet baklava, Viennese almond horns, and Chestnut cream éclairs that are better than any I’ve had in New York or Chicago. If that isn’t enough incentive, the working bakery also features imported feta cheese, house-brined olives, wedding cakes, and authentic Greek/Turkish groceries.



Posted By:  Ben Bowlin
Photo:  Ben Bowlin

Regal Tara Cinemas 4
As you all know, Cheshire Bridge is a “unique” street in Atlanta, with loads of seedy shows. I just want you to know before hand that the Tara is a Movie Theatre, to save us both any possible embarrassment. Located within the strip-joint and massage-parlor center of Atlanta, the Tara theatre is a small theatre specializing in foreign and alternative films. Although the Tara isn’t technically an independent movie theatre, being owned by United Artists and all, it is one of our city’s best local showcases for independent films that would otherwise find little or no exposure in our city outside of college campuses and bootleg DVDs. The Tara’s chief idiosyncrasy is probably the architecture— it’s a giant cube-looking thing, about twice as tall as every building around it, and if you’re as lazy as I can be, you understand how necessary it is to find easily visible buildings, since no one in this town uses their address. The snacks are good, although movie theatres make all their profit from concessions, and the Tara is no different. While the outside of the building looks shoddy, it’s markedly cleaner inside than a lot of the other, newer theatres in the area, and while the selection of films is small— four screens— the management prides itself on bringing good film to the city, without falling victim to the pretension that dogs most other art houses. For extra credit try braving the construction next door to discover some great restaurants and natural food stores.



Posted By:  Ben Bowlin
Photo:  Ben Bowlin

Return to Eden
Remember earlier in the radar, where I had that cryptic “brave the construction” line? Well, just to show I’m not bluffing, here’s an example of one of the great locations tucked away behind all that scaffolding and plywood: Return to Eden. After reviewing Rainbow Natural Foods, I was on the look-out for good independent, organic, and alternative supermarkets. While Return to Eden is perhaps more easily classified a health food store than a natural foods store, it still has loads of interesting stuff you may not see elsewhere. The fresh veggies always look awesome, and as a vegetarian I was pleasantly surprised by the large assortment of hard-to-find meat substitutes. Additionally, since Return to Eden caters to people on vegan, vegetarian, or macrobiotic diets—some of whom are medically required to follow the diet—the store does a lot of business in bulk or by-the-case sales. I had the pleasure of meeting the owner, a really nice guy with an unreasonable amount of knowledge about healthy living, alternative medicine, and other related subjects. Now that I think of it, the whole staff has expertise, and that’s a pleasant change from chain stores, where the typical employee response is, “I’m on break.” Parking is convenient and free. The exterior of the store is still being remodeled, and will be finished soon, so you’ll find a big Return to Eden sign directly over the painting pictured here.



Posted By:  Ben Bowlin
Photo:  none

Nicola's
The problem with Atlanta is that many of our night spots offer the same experience week after week; Nicola’s is an exception to this rule. When you go, be prepared for some of the best Lebanese food in town. We’re talking lemon garlic hommus with fresh pita bread, spiced lamb shanks, and a bunch of stuff that I can’t pronounce, though it’s utterly delicious. (Check the online menu for a heads-up before you go. They’ve got both meat and veggie options.) This place is a party every time I’ve been; it’s a PG-13 type of establishment, where you can take your kids or relatives from out of town. The staff is also keen to teach and show off their Middle Eastern folkdance moves at the slightest provocation. After the professional belly dancers do their set, most of the regulars join in a group dance. Also be prepared for Nicola to pull you up and make you dance, or come at you dancing himself, balancing a glass of wine on his head. There’s no cover charge, and the more people you bring, the more fun you’ll have. (Note: groups of 15+ should make reservations.). Park for free in the adjacent lot.




Powered By Subgurim(http://googlemaps.subgurim.net).Google Maps ASP.NET

See Morningside / Lenox Hills...
Restaurants (19)
Nightlife (4)
Shopping (6)
Landmarks (0)