NFT Paris All-Paris Hood

All-Paris Hood




         



On Our Radar:

Posted By:  Luca Dell'Aquila
Photo:  Luca Dell'Aquila

Sushiya
Bored of all the chinese-fake sushi bars of Paris? If you are a raw fish lover this sushiya ("sushi shop" in Japanese) is a must. Making a reservation is strongly recommended, as this pocket-sized restaurant has only ten seats. Don't be in a hurry, one man does everything. Mr. Tashichi isn't perhaps the most welcoming of hosts at first sight -- maybe for his nutty French, Japanese and English -- but his cooking speaks for itself. Here, there's only super fresh fish cut in pieces as huge as your mouth that literally melt like butter. The choices are simple: the sushi plate (26 euros) with salmon, tuna, omelet, shrimp, salmon roe, mackerel, cone sushi and futomaki, or the sashimi plate, similar but with octopus. In spite of the weird wall decor with Japanese newspapers and baby photos, the reigning zen atmosphere will definitely inspire you to make an origami on site and add it to Mr. Taschichi's collection. Another reason to go? Unlimited green tea is offered upon arrival and you can also bring your personal bottle of Chardonnay. Indeed, an unwritten BYOB policy exists, very rare in Paris. Just as this place.



Posted By:  Luca Dell'Aquila
Photo:  Luca Dell'Aquila

Le P'tit Bar
This bar is a true time capsule. At first sight the front door can give the impression of an abandoned place. No fear, you're just starting a teleportation to the post-war era. Inside, a fat gray cat, a cage of parakeets, old bottles, half washed glasses, dust and mountains of books disordely accumulated everywhere. Madame Paulo runs this hole-in-the-wall since 1965. She is perhaps the oldest bartender ever, her age is legendary, some say over 90s. What keeps this grandmother here serving Belgian beers and calvados? Her answer could be the recipe for a long mental vitality: "I thought to close the bar many times, espcially after my husband's death, but you know, here I have my bar, and I see people. Some clients have come from more than 25 years, they feel good here and me too, as long as I have my head and I'm able to stand." As you can imagine this is not the place for a crazy party or a romantic date, the stale air and the animal smell wouldn't help you (it's part of the authenticity, I suppose), but to hear some stories from an old Parisian about owning a bar all her life.



Posted By:  Anne Patault
Photo:  Anne Patault

Le Train Bleu
Beaucoup de lieux parisiens sont ce que l'on appelle chargés d'histoire, la grande histoire. Mais pour le Train Bleu cela serait plutôt la petite histoire, celles des passagers qui depuis plus d'un siècle ont mangés ici, en attendant leur train direction le sud de la France . Un « buffet de la gare » comme il n'en existe plus, conservé en l'état depuis sa construction en 1901. Un somptueux décors typique du Second Empire classé Monument Historique : vaste espace éclairé par de grandes baies vitrées, une hauteur de plafond impressionnante, des dorures, des boiseries, des lustres et cuivres rutilants, des banquettes en cuir, des sculptures et peintures représentant les paysages traversés par le PLM (Paris-Lyon-Marseille) en direction du soleil méditerranéen. Mais cet endroit n'est pas que beau. Il y a aussi du bon dans les assiettes monogrammées. La carte illustre parfaitement le mariage de la brasserie et de la gastronomie française. Saucisson brioché, Tartare préparé devant vous (comme le filet de bar), cœur de filet rôti, vacherin... Des classiques revisités avec goût, auxquels s'ajoutent un menu enfant, végétarien, et un menu TGV servi en 45 minutes pour les plus pressés. Évidemment cela a un certain prix (entre 50 et 100 euros pour les menus, sans les vins). Mais je ne regrette pas d'avoir fait une halte volontaire dans cet endroit, et cela sans avoir aucun train a prendre.J'ai juste voyagé dans le temps.



Posted By:  Alex G
Photo:  Alex G

Saint-Joseph
This year Easter took place in early April. You may wonder how the various Christian churches around the world celebrate the resurrection of Christ. Paris is a great place to find out--name your language, it's here! An almost too obvious language is English--go to Saint-Joseph on avenue Marceau, off the Champs Elysées. For an ultimately classic Roman catholic mass, hear Latin at Saint-Nicolas-du-Chardonnet, off rue Monge. Slightly less obvious is the Japanese Catholic rite--at 26, rue de Babylone on the left bank. But you can also hear the language spoken by Jesus--Aramaic. Go to rue des carmes, at Saint-Ephrem-the-Syriac. Lebanese Maronites have a church on rue d'Ulm--their mass is also partly in Aramaic, but predominantly in Arabic. You also have a choice of many autocephalous Orthodox churches--in Church Slavonic, there are the Russian Saint-Georges on rue Daru and the Serbian Saint-Sava on rue Simplon. There is also Romanian at les Saints-Archanges on rue Jean de Beauvais. What is the point of all this, you ask? To gain a sense of how diverse and tolerant Paris is when it comes to religion. Or, perhaps, to take advantage of Paris and Easter combined, to stretch our minds about those cultures around the world that all share the belief that, as Russians put it, "Jesus is resurrected--truly, he is."



Posted By:  Alex G
Photo:  Alex G

Tchaikana de Boukara
Paris restaurants have much more to offer than traditional French cuisine. There's a deep-running appreciation for ethnic foods of all kinds, usually served in tiny, uncomfortable, and ultimately cozy and heart-warming restaurants. I recommend "Tchaikana de Boukhara" for... Uzbek fares--recipes coming straight from the silk road of central Asia. Look forward to exotic, subtly-spiced, elusive tastes the likes of which you've never experienced before. Try any of the soups, or take your pick of pumpkin or lamb "samsa" pies, straight from the oven and topped with cumin seeds. Try the Tamerlan salad – named after a fearful national leader and hero, but transformed here into a tender, smoothly tart, eggplant and cucumber dish. Plov is the national dish (lamb steamed in rice, carrot and garlic), but I would skip it. Their version is too restrained and civilized – real plov is supposed to be awash with grease and garlic. The other dishes are all good bets--"chuchvara" in a light and flavourful cream sauce, Uzbekistan's response to ravioli, is out of this world. Drink Russia's tasty beer, Baltika, and make sure to try Bukhara tea--a mix of cardamom, starred anis, mint and others (and no tea). Depending on where you’re staying, they run two branches. Off of Bastille is the original, on rue Amelot 53. The new branch is east of Opera, at rue Trévise 37. Meals are €20-30, closed Sunday and Monday. Booking is advised, contact@resto-boukhara.com. Lucky you...



Posted By:  Anne Patault
Photo:  Anne Patault

Lomography Check-In!
Oyez, oyez ! Touristes Lomographes Américains, la Lomographie a aussi son Ambassade à Paris ! Pour ceux qui ne jurent que par le numérique, passez votre chemin. Ici tout n’est qu’argentique, appareils en plastiques aux looks vintages, couleurs saturées, cadrage approximatifs et flous artistiques. Et pour mieux résumer ce qu’est la Lomographie à ceux qui la découvre, la règle d’or est simple« Don’t think, shoot ! ». Pour ceux qui comme moi ont toujours du mal avec le numérique, cet endroit est un havre de paix. Oubliés les mégapixels, les cartes mémoires et les écrans LCD, et retour à l’essentiel, du plastoc, des lamelles, un trou, et une pellicule ! A Paris, l’Ambassadeur de la Lomographie s’appelle Peter Boesh. La taille de ce grand elfe moustachu n’a d’égal que sa gentillesse à vous renseigner au milieu du large choix de ce magasin, sorte de salle de transit d’aéroport. Et pour cause. Ce magasin qui ne devait être que temporaire a finalement posé ses valises définitivement. Rentrer ici et vous avez l’impression d’être déjà en partance (est-ce aussi à cause de l’encens qui brûle dans un coin ?). Ceux qui possèdent déjà un Diana ou un LC-A trouveront ici les accessoires et films qui leur manquent, ainsi que tous les produits dérivés (t-shirts, sacs, carnets, badges…) liés à la marque. Alors même si ce magasin n’est pas situé dans l’endroit le plus touristique de Paris, elle vaut vraiment le déplacement.



Posted By:  Alex G
Photo:  Alex G

Place Edouard VII
Forget the Franco-British rivalry. Paris has lots of streets and landmarks named after English kings. George V lends his name to a prestigious avenue off Champs Elysées, as well as to one of Paris' elite hotels. The avenue leading up to City Hall is avenue Victoria. But best--most obscure, but by no means least--is square Edouard VII, named after the son of Queen Victoria, who did not access the throne until his mother died, in the years leading to World War I. This, right behind the opera house, is the "square", the plaza you must look make the effort find. It is a shocking oasis of quiet in the heart of a bustling business district. It has a charming statue of Edward on a horse. Every other store is dedicated to England--"Old England", "Maple English furniture", the list goes on. Even the theatre is called after Edward--after all, he funded it as his contribution to his favourite city. Most surprisingly--but this proves stones have memories--the fashionable restaurant that opened only recently on that square is called "Bertie"--after Edward VII's affectionate nickname. So if you're feeling homesick, or if you want to see a landmark that most tourists miss, make your way to square Edouard VII, right behind the Paris Opera.



Posted By:  Alex G
Photo:  Alex G

Mémorial de la Déportation
This is the first of a series. We would like to direct the NFT reader to great, picturesque, and little-known sites located just a stone's throw away from Paris' major attractions. We can start with Paris' (and Europe's for that matter) most visited monument--Notre Dame. We suggest also visiting the impressive memorial dedicated to the 250,000 Frenchmen (Jews, resistants etc.) who died in Nazi concentration camps during World War II. This edifice is nothing but concrete, some metal, and burning candles--and it conveys an overwhelming sense of claustrophobia. People sometimes refer to it as "the crypt." The Mémorial de la deportation faces Saint-Louis island, it is to found to the back of Notre Dame.



Posted By:  Devon McCormack
Photo:  Devon McCormack

Le Montana
From the name you might be expecting an American style dive bar with moose heads and plaid on the wall. Think again. This painfully cool left bank establishment was designed as a playground for the city's creative elite. Located right around the corner from the famed Café Flore, Montana is where you go to see and be seen. During fashion week you can't swing a Chanel bag in this place without knocking over multiple Vogue editors, a few models, and maybe Kanye West. The bar was re-opened in 2009 under the ownership of Purple magazine editor Olivier Zahm and graffiti artist André. If possible it's even smaller then its sister club, Le Baron. Upstairs the sitting area has black walls decorated with white botanical drawings, perfect for sipping a Kir Royal while scoping out the scene. Downstairs, shattered mirrors line the tunnel walls where hip young things spin around the tiny dance floor. There are no rules and no mercy at the door. Entry is by association only.



Posted By:  Anne Patault
Photo:  Anne Patault

Tombées du camion
Il y a quelques jours de cela, je suis tombée amoureuse…d’un Cabinet de Curiosités. Il n’a fallu qu’un regard, le mien, qui croise celui de dizaines d’yeux de poupées anciennes qui m’observaient, sagement rangés dans une petite boîte en bois. En une fraction de seconde, un sourire s’affiche sur mon visage et je remarque qu’il en est de même pour tous les visiteurs. Plus que de la magie… Le propriétaire, Charles Mas, parle de son magasin en ses termes « …stocks exclusifs d’usine abandonnées, jouets manufacturés du siècle dernier, matériel de laboratoire, trésors artisanaux en quantité, accumulations en tout genre, archéologie de l’enfance… ». Tout est dit. Ici pas d’objet unique ou rare, mais une mise en scène insolite d’objets hétéroclites en quantité limitée : boutons anciens, porte-clefs Zorro (le vrai Zorro, Guy Williams…j’avoue j’ai craqué!), des broches mégots écrasés, des étiquettes anciennes, des poupées, des cadrans de montre, des flacons du 19ème, des chemises des années 70 ou encore les désormais très recherchées lampes Jielde « dans leur jus ». Et cet assemblage anachronique fonctionne à merveille. La surprise, l’émotion et la nostalgie sont au rendez-vous. La boutique nous fait remonter dans le temps, un temps que nous n’avons pas forcément connu mais qui nous parle. Un lieu inspiré et inspirant. Chaque visiteur peut ensuite ramener chez lui un ou plusieurs petits trésors de cette caverne d’Ali Baba dont la majorité des prix ne dépasse pas 10 euros.



Posted By:  Anne Patault
Photo:  Anne Patault

French Touche
Il est parfois bon de sortir des chemins battus et rebattus par des centaines de Birkenstock et autres tennis avant vous. Le 17ème arrondissement de Paris n’est sans doute pas le plus fréquenté par les touristes, mais il renferme un petit bijou, que les Japonais connaissent déjà (et oui …). Une « galerie d’objets touchants », dixit leurs propriétaires, deux femmes de goût. Une petite caverne d’Ali Baba des créateurs. Bijoux, objets insolites ou ludiques, mode femme (notamment avec « Please Don’t », mon chouchou), homme ou enfants, T-shirts sérigraphiés, badges, doudous, déco, luminaire, sacs, cahiers…impossible d’énumérer tous les objets que vous trouverez ici en série limitée, et à tous les prix. Sans oublier leur propre label musical et leurs « chansonpoche », une chanson inédite d’un artiste qui les a séduit, et qui tient sur une carte! Alors oubliez un peu votre mp3 et cherchez au grenier votre platine cd.. Pop, poétique ou trendy, on en ressort forcément avec un petit quelque chose et le bonheur de savoir qu’il est presque unique.



Posted By:  Anne Patault
Photo:  Anne Patault

Uniqlo
Mais qu'est-ce qui peut susciter la convoitise d'autant de parisiens en ce mois frileux d'octobre, au point d'attendre dehors pendant presque une heure? Un nouveau magasin Nespresso inauguré par G. Clooney en personne? Non…le nouveau flagship Uniqlo. Pour ceux qui l'ignorent encore, ou bien qui ont passé ses dernières semaines au fond de la jungle amazonienne (seul moyen d’avoir échappé à leur campagne de publicité), l'enseigne de prêt-à-porter japonaise s'est enfin installée en plein cœur du quartier des grands magasins, tout proche de ses concurrents étrangers H et M, Zara et Gap. Les 2 boutiques éphémères de cet été avaient déjà conquis les foules: des jeans aux pantalons en passant par les pulls et les t-shirts, Uniqlo décline ses basiques dans toutes les couleurs Pantone à des prix très attractifs, avec une mention spéciale pour ses pulls en cachemire à 39.90 euros pour l'ouverture, et les jeans à 9.90 euros! Coupes simples, absence de logo et qualité ont fini de conquérir les plus réticents, si toute fois ils existent. Alors si, comme moi, vous voulez succomber au charme nippon, armez-vous de patience (d’ENORMEMENT de patience), de café bien chaud,de bonnes chaussettes et peut-être aussi d'une couverture de survie, et ne croyez pas être sortis d’affaire une fois le seuil franchi…l'attente se fait aussi pour essayer et aux caisses! Mais quand on aime…




Powered By Subgurim(http://googlemaps.subgurim.net).Google Maps ASP.NET

See All-Paris Hood...
Restaurants (18)
Nightlife (4)
Shopping (9)
Landmarks (5)